Detailed guide to installing LND and Bitcoind on Ubuntu 16 ...

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How to install Bitcoin Repository in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Would someone please provide step-by-step instructions. Thank you!
https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
submitted by PerpetualTurbulence to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoind Ubuntu PPA question

Why the Ubuntu PPA https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin is not updated to the latest Core version?
If I have a node installed with PPA, how can I update the software manually to the latest Core version?
submitted by Mr--Robot to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to compile Yenten coin GUI in Ubuntu 19.04

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get -y upgrade sudo apt-get install build-essential sudo apt-get install libtool autotools-dev autoconf sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install libboost1.65-all-dev sudo apt-get install pkg-config libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler git sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev
git clone https://github.com/yentencoin/yenten.git cd yenten sed -i 's/fPIE/fPIC/g' configure.ac
wget http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu/pool/main/o/openssl1.0/libssl1.0.0_1.0.2n-1ubuntu6.2_amd64.deb sudo dpkg -i libssl1.0.0_1.0.2n-1ubuntu6.2_amd64.deb wget http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu/pool/main/o/openssl1.0/libssl1.0-dev_1.0.2n-1ubuntu6.2_amd64.deb sudo dpkg -i libssl1.0-dev_1.0.2n-1ubuntu6.2_amd64.deb
wget https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin/+build/12096244/+files/libdb4.8_4.8.30-xenial4_amd64.deb sudo dpkg -i libdb4.8_4.8.30-xenial4_amd64.deb wget https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin/+build/12096244/+files/libdb4.8-dev_4.8.30-xenial4_amd64.deb sudo dpkg -i libdb4.8-dev_4.8.30-xenial4_amd64.deb wget https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin/+build/12096244/+files/libdb4.8++_4.8.30-xenial4_amd64.deb sudo dpkg -i libdb4.8++_4.8.30-xenial4_amd64.deb wget https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin/+build/12096244/+files/libdb4.8++-dev_4.8.30-xenial4_amd64.deb sudo dpkg -i libdb4.8++-dev_4.8.30-xenial4_amd64.deb
./autogen.sh CXXFLAGS=-O2 ./configure --enable-upnp-default --with-gui=qt5 --disable-tests make
submitted by bubasss to Yenten [link] [comments]

Solo mining for Gits and Shiggles

I run a full Bitcoin node. Lately I've been playing around with setting up solo mining with BFGMiner, just experimenting with CPUs and GPUs, in full knowledge its a purely academic thing with zero chance of succeeding, intending only to deepen my understanding of the system. Seems to work well, for the most part.
Except when I point my S9's at the pool, I only get about 250 GH instead of 13.5 TH each. I've made sure to turn off overt asciboost when I point them at my experiment, no effect, and they definitely are connected. Does anyone else play around with this stuff and might know the solution already?
FWIW: Ubuntu Bitcoin Core v0.17 BFGMiner v5.5.0
Bitcoin.conf, server, daemon, listen, and txindex set to 1. rpcuser and rpcpassword are set, rpcallowip and rpcport are all good(and proven as I can connect other pcs over the LAN just fine for cpu/gpu)
BFGMiner -o http://127.0.01:8332 -u user - pword --generate-to $address --coinbase-sig "LOL" --stratum-port:3333
Any suggestions?
submitted by NDragon951 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

I am now running Bitcoin Unlimited - How to change over your Ubuntu node in 5 minutes

If you, like me, are not running Bitcoin Unlimited at least in part because you think it might be difficult to do so, let me assure you it is very easy. I was surprised to learn BU has an Ubuntu repository. The commands below worked for me to remove my previous Bitcoin client and replace it with BU. The blockchain and database is untouched so you will NOT need to redownload the blockchain. I was up and running again in minutes.
bitcoin-cli stop sudo apt remove bitcoind sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/bitcoin-ubuntu-bitcoin* sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bu-ppa sudo apt update sudo apt install bitcoind bitcoind -daemon 
Your mileage may vary depending on your specific setup. Hope this helps someone!
EDIT 1/17/18: The above instructions will configure the Bitcoin Core version of Bitcoin Unlimited. If you want Bitcoin Cash, you need to use the repository ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bucash INSTEAD of ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bu-ppa.
submitted by Hewbacca to btc [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Speeding up 0.13.0 adoption - Ubuntu PPA on old version

Ubuntu PPA [0] channel (stable) still contains old 0.12.1 release of bitcoind. I would love to update to 0.13.0, but that means not using package manager anymore. Do many people use this PPA? Will updating it to new version speedup adoption of 0.13.0?
[0] https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
submitted by exo762 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Create bitcoin full node with tor: step by step guide

This is a step by step guide for anyone that need to create a full bitcoin node through tor. This guide is for Ubuntu linux and it can apply to all linux distros
  1. Install bitcoind The first step is to install bitcoind. First we need to add ppa repositories from here https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin After that we install bitcoind with command sudo apt-get update to sync the repos and after that sudo apt-get install bitcoind
2.Install Tor Then we need to install Tor and again we add repos from official site here https://www.torproject.org/docs/debian.html.en After that we give to terminal sudo apt-get uppdate and after the sync we give sudo apt-get install tor
3.Edit bitcoin.conf file After that we need to edit a new bitcoin.conf file. in a terminal we give cd .bitcoin/ nano bitcoin.conf In this new file we add this
server=1 daemon=1 maxconnections= rpcuser=wechoosearandomusernamewithnumberandletter rpcpassword=arandompasswithnumberandletters listen=1 onlynet=tor externalip=OurOnionIp bind=127.0.0.1:8333 proxy=127.0.0.1:9050
we can find our onion ip to /valib/tobitcoin-service/ and there to the file hostname The ip is a string with number,letters and it ends with .onion. To maxconnections we can add whatever connections we want to have.The limit is 120 i think
4.We edit the file /etc/totorrc and we add this entries HiddenServiceDir /valib/tobitcoin-service/ HiddenServicePort 8333 127.0.0.1:8333 HiddenServicePort 18333 127.0.0.1:18333
5.Finally we give to the terminal bitcoind
Tor need a half hour to sync and to accept connections We need to open 8333 port to our router so it can accept connections
submitted by chek2fire to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin PPA doesn't have version 16.0 for Pi 3?

Hi! I'm trying to upgrade my Pi 3 bitcoin node to version 16.0, but it seems like the armhf target isn't currently in the PPA: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Is there a reason for this? Is there a guide for Linux noobs (like myself) to either upgrade from binaries or build from source? THANKS!!
submitted by MikeG4936 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Keep your Bitcoin Core UASF node up to date

Note to folks with a fake uacomment: that neither helps nor works. Upgrade to BIP148!
Those who want to use BIP148 have two main choices: UASF BIP148 and Bitcoin Knots. The first has bip148 enabled by default. The second follows a PR originally proposed to Bitcoin Core (and rejected) which adds bip148=0 (option, disabled by default) so it needs to be enabled in configuration file or at runtime.
Make a backup of your wallet.dat, just in case.

Bitcoin Core SegWit UASF BIP148

This is the "original" BIP148 version.
1) Get the source at https://github.com/UASF/bitcoin/releases.
Current release: v1.0 - https://github.com/UASF/bitcoin/releases/tag/v0.14.2-uasfsegwit1.0
As a reminder, your install options are as follows:
a) Binaries: Bitcoin Core v0.14.2-based UASF SegWit BIP148 can be downloaded here (decompress and then run desired binary (bitcoind for daemon/server, bitcoin-cli for the CLI, etc.) which you can find in bin subdirectory; there's also a PPA for Ubuntu users who prefer apt-get install).
b) Source: get the source at the URL at the top. Build as usual, following official Bitcoin Core instructions.
To install, stop and (if you want) remove existing Bitcoin Core. Then install and run Bitcoin SegWit UASF BIP148. Windows users who use installer (filenames that end with *setup-unsigned.exe) should first uninstall existing Bitcoin Core before they install this version.
How to verify binaries (signatures):
https://np.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6c5zw3/howto_verify_the_signed_uasf_released_binaries/
You can also verify checksums by importing Luke's PGP key and ensuring checksums in SHA256SUMS.asc(example here) match those of the downloaded file(s).

Bitcoin Knots

This is Luke-Jr's Bitcoin release with many enhancements and a BIP148 option. You can find more at https://bitcoinknots.org.
Get it at bitcoinknots.org. Install procedure for binaries is the same as for UASF BIP148 binaries, but with one added step:
Windows users who use installer (filenames that end with *setup-unsigned.exe) need to first uninstall existing Bitcoin Core before they can install this version.
If you want to build from the source, refer to Bitcoin Knots documentation (because it has a number of different options compared to Bitcoin Core).
How to verify binaries (signatures): download and import Luke's PGP key, refresh PGP keys, then verify the signed checksums file corresponds to the checksum of the binary you downloaded for your system.

Updating installed binaries

If you're updating either UASF BIP148 or Knots binaries (which you downloaded as zip or tgz file and decompressed to your disk), stop Bitcoin, decompress newer binaries over old binaries, then start service again. You can also move old binaries and then deploy the latest binaries.

Reverting to Bitcoin Core

Before chain split

Prior to chain split (such as before Aug 1), you can "go back" by simply removing BIP148 or Knots and installing Bitcoin Core 0.14.2. You can't go back to an earlier release such as 0.12 (same behavior as with Bitcoin Core).
Starting with UASF BIP148 v1.0, however, there's less need to be concerned about going back to Bitcoin Core - as mentioned above, Bitcoin Core 0.14.2 behavior can be achieved by restarting UASF BIP148 v1.0 or Bitcoin Knots with bitp148=0.
Should you want to remove UASF BIP148-compatible and run Bitcoin Core 0.14.2, you can do this:
Then install Bitcoin Core 0.14.2.

In the case of a chain split

Please remember to pay special attention to wallet.dat if you use one. This section only deals with the change of the binary and blockchain rewind, and not coin splitting and wallet backups.
If chains splits on or after August 1st, you would have to rewind the blockchain in order to use a different Bitcoin release on another chain. Details will vary depending on the circumstances (for example, we can't know in advance which chains will exist.)
UASF BIP148 v1.0 (not older releases) makes it possible to set bip148=0 and restart which automatically rewinds the blockchain to be consistent with Core. If you wanted to change to Bitcoin Core, you could first restart UASF BIP148 or Knots with bip148=0 to rewind the blockchain, then uninstall the binaries and install Bitcoin Core.
If a chain split happens, check UASFGuide.com or this subreddit for specific details.

Be back in late July!

In the second half of July, check for updates on a weekly basis. There may be further updates or improvements.

Changelog

2017-07-12 - reminder to pay attention to wallet backup in case of changing the binaries or startup options after a chain split
2017-07-11 - download links updated for v1.0, added about auto-rewind in v1.0, other small edits
Edit: this post may be updated prior to August 1st.
submitted by eustan to UASF [link] [comments]

Ubuntu Bitcoin Wallet?

I'm looking for a Ubuntu Bitcoin wallet, any suggestions?
submitted by A1nerd to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Ubuntu Bitcoin-QT syncing issue

I have restart and reinstall ubuntu bitcoin qt couple times on ubuntu, but I still have trouble syncing. Please see the debug.log https://paste.fedoraproject.org/500218/09953201/
submitted by uncoolloser to btc [link] [comments]

ELI5 - How to update bitcoin qt linux

How do I update Bitcoin Core in my Linux Machine ?
Edit
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
sudo apt-get update
https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin?field.series_filter= Looks like last update was (2014-04-19) Am I wrong ?
How can i get update that was released a few days ago ?
submitted by doge_kz to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC community? Here is a exhaustive manual to get you up and running. (Only takes about 20-30 minutes if you are fluent in command prompt on linux).

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to rBitcoin [link] [comments]

Running a full node using Bitcoin-daemon. Instructions for Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to BTC_Reviews [link] [comments]

Ubuntu Bitcoin ppa update?

I'm trying to update all my public ubuntu Bitcoin nodes to .9 but the ppa isn't updated yet.
submitted by catwelder to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited 1.9.0 has just been released

Download the latest Bitcoin Cash compatible release of BCH Unlimited (1.9.0, August 26th, 2020) from:
 
https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/releases/tag/BCHunlimited1.9.0.0
 
This is a major release of BCH Unlimited compatible with the upcoming protocol upgrade of the Bitcoin Cash network. You could find November 15th, 2020 upgrade specifications here:
BCH Unlimited 1.9.0 is against and is not going to implement the 8% IFP tax proposed by Bitcoin ABC
This is list of the main changes that have been merged in this release:
 
Release notes:
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/dev/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.9.0.md
 
PS Ubuntu PPA repository is currently being updated to serve for 1.9.0.
submitted by s1ckpig to btc [link] [comments]

Gridcoin 5.0.0.0-Mandatory "Fern" Release

https://github.com/gridcoin-community/Gridcoin-Research/releases/tag/5.0.0.0
Finally! After over ten months of development and testing, "Fern" has arrived! This is a whopper. 240 pull requests merged. Essentially a complete rewrite that was started with the scraper (the "neural net" rewrite) in "Denise" has now been completed. Practically the ENTIRE Gridcoin specific codebase resting on top of the vanilla Bitcoin/Peercoin/Blackcoin vanilla PoS code has been rewritten. This removes the team requirement at last (see below), although there are many other important improvements besides that.
Fern was a monumental undertaking. We had to encode all of the old rules active for the v10 block protocol in new code and ensure that the new code was 100% compatible. This had to be done in such a way as to clear out all of the old spaghetti and ring-fence it with tightly controlled class implementations. We then wrote an entirely new, simplified ruleset for research rewards and reengineered contracts (which includes beacon management, polls, and voting) using properly classed code. The fundamentals of Gridcoin with this release are now on a very sound and maintainable footing, and the developers believe the codebase as updated here will serve as the fundamental basis for Gridcoin's future roadmap.
We have been testing this for MONTHS on testnet in various stages. The v10 (legacy) compatibility code has been running on testnet continuously as it was developed to ensure compatibility with existing nodes. During the last few months, we have done two private testnet forks and then the full public testnet testing for v11 code (the new protocol which is what Fern implements). The developers have also been running non-staking "sentinel" nodes on mainnet with this code to verify that the consensus rules are problem-free for the legacy compatibility code on the broader mainnet. We believe this amount of testing is going to result in a smooth rollout.
Given the amount of changes in Fern, I am presenting TWO changelogs below. One is high level, which summarizes the most significant changes in the protocol. The second changelog is the detailed one in the usual format, and gives you an inkling of the size of this release.

Highlights

Protocol

Note that the protocol changes will not become active until we cross the hard-fork transition height to v11, which has been set at 2053000. Given current average block spacing, this should happen around October 4, about one month from now.
Note that to get all of the beacons in the network on the new protocol, we are requiring ALL beacons to be validated. A two week (14 day) grace period is provided by the code, starting at the time of the transition height, for people currently holding a beacon to validate the beacon and prevent it from expiring. That means that EVERY CRUNCHER must advertise and validate their beacon AFTER the v11 transition (around Oct 4th) and BEFORE October 18th (or more precisely, 14 days from the actual date of the v11 transition). If you do not advertise and validate your beacon by this time, your beacon will expire and you will stop earning research rewards until you advertise and validate a new beacon. This process has been made much easier by a brand new beacon "wizard" that helps manage beacon advertisements and renewals. Once a beacon has been validated and is a v11 protocol beacon, the normal 180 day expiration rules apply. Note, however, that the 180 day expiration on research rewards has been removed with the Fern update. This means that while your beacon might expire after 180 days, your earned research rewards will be retained and can be claimed by advertising a beacon with the same CPID and going through the validation process again. In other words, you do not lose any earned research rewards if you do not stake a block within 180 days and keep your beacon up-to-date.
The transition height is also when the team requirement will be relaxed for the network.

GUI

Besides the beacon wizard, there are a number of improvements to the GUI, including new UI transaction types (and icons) for staking the superblock, sidestake sends, beacon advertisement, voting, poll creation, and transactions with a message. The main screen has been revamped with a better summary section, and better status icons. Several changes under the hood have improved GUI performance. And finally, the diagnostics have been revamped.

Blockchain

The wallet sync speed has been DRASTICALLY improved. A decent machine with a good network connection should be able to sync the entire mainnet blockchain in less than 4 hours. A fast machine with a really fast network connection and a good SSD can do it in about 2.5 hours. One of our goals was to reduce or eliminate the reliance on snapshots for mainnet, and I think we have accomplished that goal with the new sync speed. We have also streamlined the in-memory structures for the blockchain which shaves some memory use.
There are so many goodies here it is hard to summarize them all.
I would like to thank all of the contributors to this release, but especially thank @cyrossignol, whose incredible contributions formed the backbone of this release. I would also like to pay special thanks to @barton2526, @caraka, and @Quezacoatl1, who tirelessly helped during the testing and polishing phase on testnet with testing and repeated builds for all architectures.
The developers are proud to present this release to the community and we believe this represents the starting point for a true renaissance for Gridcoin!

Summary Changelog

Accrual

Changed

Most significantly, nodes calculate research rewards directly from the magnitudes in EACH superblock between stakes instead of using a two- or three- point average based on a CPID's current magnitude and the magnitude for the CPID when it last staked. For those long-timers in the community, this has been referred to as "Superblock Windows," and was first done in proof-of-concept form by @denravonska.

Removed

Beacons

Added

Changed

Removed

Unaltered

As a reminder:

Superblocks

Added

Changed

Removed

Voting

Added

Changed

Removed

Detailed Changelog

[5.0.0.0] 2020-09-03, mandatory, "Fern"

Added

Changed

Removed

Fixed

submitted by jamescowens to gridcoin [link] [comments]

How do I spend the on-chain outputs in C-Lightning

Ubuntu 20.04.
I'm shutting down my Lightning and Bitcoin Core node because it's using too much data. I've had two months of data overages that cost me over $100.
I've already shut down all my channels and I've got four transaction outputs. How do I spend the money and send it to another Bitcoin address?
submitted by NateNate60 to lightningnetwork [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited 1.9.0.1 has just been released

Download the latest Bitcoin Cash compatible release of BCH Unlimited (1.9.0.1, September 29th, 2020) from:
 
https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download
https://gitlab.com/bitcoinunlimited/BCHUnlimited/-/releases/BCHunlimited1.9.0.1
 
This is a minor bugs fix release of BCH Unlimited compatible with the upcoming protocol upgrade of the Bitcoin Cash network. You could find Nov 15th, 2020 upgrade specifications here:
 
This is the list of the main changes that have been merged in this release:
 
see the release notes for more detail:
https://gitlab.com/bitcoinunlimited/BCHUnlimited/-/blob/dev/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.9.0.1.md
 
You could also find binaries in this repository https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimitedWebDownloads/
 
PS Ubuntu PPA repository is currently being updated to serve for 1.9.0.1
submitted by s1ckpig to btc [link] [comments]

Server Node Set Up

Set up a server node in under 5 minutes with the Ubuntu automated script to further decentralize the Bitcoin Black network. https://bitcoin.black/setting-up-node-on-linux-serve
Bounties valid until end of October 2020: 200,000 BCB paid at the end of October 2020 (For successfully setting up a node). 100,000 BCB paid at the end of March 2021 (90+% uptime). 200,000 BCB paid at the end of October 2021(90+% uptime). Bounties will be lowered as more principle representatives join the network.
If you have the knowledge to run and manage a full time server node 50 million coins will be delegated to your node and you will become a principle representative.
https://bitcoin.black
submitted by Markedtofuture to AllAboardBitcoinBlack [link] [comments]

Distortion with a Focusrite Scarlett Solo (3rd Gen)

EDIT2: I can find no pattern to this mind numbingly frustrating problem. Switching back and forth between devices and sample rates in Reaper is not solving the problem now. I have no clue what does it.
EDIT: Just FYI, it looks like changing the sample rate in /etc/pulse/pulse/daemon.conf didn't actually solve it, though it's only just happened for the first time in a long time. I did find that going BACK to ALSA in Reaper, changing the sample rate there, and then switching back to Pulse (still in Reaper) fixed it at least this time though, so anyone who comes across this can try that.
I'm running Ubuntu 20.04. I often deal with very fuzzy distortion from my Scarlett Solo audio interface (EDIT: the distortion is on the output, not the input). Sometimes I don't notice what causes it to start, but it does seem to have several causes. For example, Opening up PulseAudio Sound Control or opening/closing Reaper can cause it to start, and there doesn't seem to be a way to fix it besides restarting. Looks like it only affects PulseAudio, since selecting ALSA as my driver in Reaper does eliminate the distortion in Reaper, but I'm still stuck with the distortion everywhere else until I restart.
Here's what it sounds like:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oPbP1vOIcE
(Original video for comparison, though I don't think you'll need it)
If I try to record the output to OBS, I get undistorted audio in the recording.
Any idea what's going on here, and how to prevent it?
Potentially relevant information:
This has happened regularly for a long time. Sorry if that makes it harder to diagnose. I just haven't had the energy to look into it until now.
I started with Ubuntu Studio 18.04. (This comes with JACK, and maybe there's a conflict there? I'm a terrible linux audio user, because I still haven't really figured out JACK.)
When I first installed the OS, I followed some tutorials to set up Ubuntu for Audio. (Many of the things were, apparently, not already set, even with Ubuntu Studio.) Unfortunately, I couldn't tell you what all I did. (It was a while ago, before I had the interface, iirc.)
Also, while I realize it wouldn't really come close to compensating folks for their time and effort, I'd love to tip a few dollars of Bitcoin Cash to anyone who can help me here, at least to show that I appreciate and value that time and effort. And of course, please feel free to point me towards required reading, or ask for more info I should provide. Thanks in advance!
Ubuntu 20.04
Xfce
GTX 2070 Super
GA-970A-UD3P
AMD 8320
Focusrite Scarlett Solo (3rd Gen)
submitted by AD1AD to linuxaudio [link] [comments]

How To Install BitCoin On Ubuntu 16.04 Linux Ubuntu 18.04 LTS - Actualizar Bitcoin Core How to Recover & Reload a BITCOIN WALLET 0.8.1-beta Win 7 Bitcoin Install and Update on Ubuntu Linux ( my experience ) Ubuntu Coin Wallet

Bitcoin Core should also work on most other Unix-like systems but is not as frequently tested on them. It is not recommended to use Bitcoin Core on unsupported systems. From Bitcoin Core 0.20.0 onwards, macOS versions earlier than 10.12 are no longer supported. Additionally, Bitcoin Core does not yet change appearance when macOS “dark mode ... January 30, 2019 / 0 Comments / in Blog, Linux / by BMS2019. As you probably already know, we try to find and feature the best Bitcoin mining software for all operating systems, and Linux mining software is no exception. In this article, I’ll show you how to setup the Bitcoin mining software for Ubuntu. Right now, we have 2 Linux mining apps featured on our website- Cudo Miner and MinerGate ... I am having the trouble with installation of bitcoind on Ubuntu v20 VPS system. How i try to make it done with official tutorial: "If you use Ubuntu, you don’t need to compile bitcoind and bitcoin-cli from source. How-To build Bitcoin from sources on Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr. Install additional Software. sudo apt-get install build-essential libtool autotools-dev autoconf pkg-config libssl-dev sudo apt-get install libboost-dev sudo apt-get install libboost-all-dev sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libdb4.8-dev libdb4.8++-dev libgmp-dev I'm trying to compile v0.8.6 of the core client from source, in order to compare IDB (Initial Blockchain Download) performance between versions. I created a fresh Ubuntu Xenial 16.04 machine on Am...

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How To Install BitCoin On Ubuntu 16.04

Using Ubuntu 10.4, bitcoin 0.3.24, I show my installation of Bitcoin. These are the commands to install bitcoin; sudo apt-add-repository ppa:stretch/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get ... This video covers the method to install BitCoins on Ubuntu 16.04 Bitcoin is a virtual and crypto-currency created by Satoshi Nakamoto. For more explanation o... This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue Queue In this video, we show you how the Ubuntu Coin Wallet works! #ubuntucoin #buy #digital #gold #blockchain #movement. Recover & Reload BitCoin Wallet 0.8.1-beat win 7 0:14 Advanced How2 Recover a Wallet from Crash 0:20 Recovery step by step 0:27 Reload a wallet.dat to BitCoin Wallet 0.8.1-beta Win 7 0:34 Notes ...

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